LETTRES D'UN CARTON À L'ÂGE D'AIRAIN
04.11.21 - 18.12.21

JEAN-MICHEL FAUQUET
#1
Untitled, 2010
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
39 x 49,5 cm
Price : 10 000 Euros
#2 Untitled, 2008
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
39 x 49,5 cm
Price : 10 000 Euros
#3 Untitled, 2002
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
48,5 x 48,5 cm
Price : 11 000 Euros
#4 Untitled, 2012
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
39 x 29,5 cm
Price : 6 000 Euros
#5 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
Price : 10 000 Euros
#6 Untitled, 2008
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
30,5 x 29 cm
Price : 5 000 Euros
#7 Untitled, 1998
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
32,5 x 29,5 cm
Price : 5 000 Euros
#8 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
15,5 x 22 cm
Price : 3 000 Euros
#9 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
15,5 x 22 cm
Price : 3 000 Euros
#10 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
73 x 58,5 cm
Price : 15 000 Euros
#11 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
78 x 53,5 cm
Price : 15 000 Euros
#12 Untitled, 2002
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
39 x 49,5 cm
Price : 10 000 Euros
#13 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
22,5 x 29,5 cm
Price : 4 500 Euros
#14 Untitled, 2002
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
48,5 x 48,5 cm
Price : 11 000 Euros
#15 Untitled, 2002
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
39 x 49,5 cm
Price : 10 000 Euros
Exhibition view – Gallery Maïa Muller , Copyright Rebecca Fanuele
Each piece costs 3 500 Euros
#16 Untitled, 2010
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
39 x 29,5 cm
Reserved
Exhibition view – Gallery Maïa Muller, Copyright Rebecca Fanuele
#17 Untitled, 2008
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
58,5 x 49 cm
#18 Untitled, 2008
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
58,5 x 49 cm
Price of triptyque: 36 000 Euros
#19 Untitled, 2008
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
58,5 x 49 cm
#20 Untitled, 2003
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
28,5 x 22,5 cm
Price: 4 500 Euros
Exhibition view – Gallery Maïa Muller, Copyright Rebecca Fanuele
#21 Untitled, 1998
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
17 x 46,5 cm
Sold
#22 Untitled, 1998
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
17 x 46,5 cm
Sold
#23 Untitled, 1998-2002
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
17 x 46,5 cm each
Price: 6 000 Euros pièce
#24 Untitled, 1998
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
17 x 46,5 cm
Price: 6 000 Euros
#25 Untitled, 2012
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
59 x 50 cm
Price: 12 000 Euros
#26 Untitled
Cardboard, oil, wax
26 x 92 x 14,5 cm
Price: 6 000 Euros
#27 Untitled
Cardboard, oil, wax
39 x 16 x 19 cm  ( each )
Price: 7 000 Euros
#28 Untitled, 2002
Silver print on enhanced baryta paper
39 x 49,5 cm
Price: 10 000 Euros
#29 Untitled, 1998
Silver print on baryta paper enhanced with paint and wax
48,5 x 48,5 cm
Price: 11 000 Euros
#30 Untitled
Cardboard, oil, wax
33 x 66 x 23 cm
Price: 6 500 Euros

Jean-Michel Fauquet
The Ascent of the Invisible

« It may be that the moral force scattered throughout the world represents its will to become the sun once more. […]
Everywhere a ray of sun strikes on a darkened door. »*
Cézanne
They come from somewhere else, they come from afar, they appear in the secrecy of daily practice, through roughs, through sketches, by intrusion, like dreams produced without one’s knowledge… The drawings of Jean-Michel Fauquet then become cardboard sculptures and appear in his photos in the form of objects like the poetic milestones of a creative night, of “another scene” (eine “andere Schauplatz”) as Freud defined the unconscious in his book “The Interpretation of Dreams”. A scene that is active, productive and open but whose access is unknown, unexpected, dreamlike, and elusive. Also Jean- Michel Fauquet is always alert, never ambushed. He lets himself be surprised. The shapes are enigmatic, so he tames them by sculpting them and then staging them in a fragile and evanescent theatricality. A photograph opens up its destiny. But to “kill the image”, as he puts it, and “return it to the mysteries of the invisible”, he works on the print, overworks it in wax, in oil and with highlights of paint. A new world emerges. This world contains certain surrealist and Dadaist connections, but it is singularly weighty. “Things are serious, so you have to ascend,” he says. To gain height perhaps but above all to give weight to a form. And this weight is hybrid: it appears in two dimensions in the photograph but is, in essence, a three-dimensional space. With him, photography contains the sculpture and seems to aspire to liberate it towards forms that are conducive to touch, to the experience of bodies, to materialised intensities.
In this sense, the work of Jean-Michel Fauquet is related to that of the American artist Richard Serra and to his monumental sculptures which are volumes of feeling; heaviness in equilibrium. Jean-Michel Fauquet, for his part, sculpts objects in an out-of-time space, their imaginary density acting as centres of real energy. “I’m making signs for the theatre of your life,” he says, adding that his photos show what you bring to them, even without you knowing it. They indeed have the power of revealing, of apparition.
Several experiences have given Jean-Michel Fauquet’s world its junctions with the invisible. In his childhood in the Béarn province, there were Spanish refugees fleeing the Franco dictatorship on foot, suddenly arriving from above, on the mountain ridge of the Pyrenees. Most significantly, there was this boarding school near Bordeaux where discipline served as the educational ideal. You had to defy risks and dangers to get out of the dormitory at night, go meet in the attic with a few teenage comrades and, there, see the unhoped-for appearing: freedom. It was materialized by the grace of a rudimentary object from the beginning of photography, the so-called “printing frame”. It is a small instrument in which to wedge a piece of silver nitrate photo- sensitized paper, expose it to light and wait for an unexpected shape to appear. Coming from the light.
The visual freedom experienced in this constrained environment imagination around real life and unknown around the desirable. This is the path to art. Jean-Michel Fauquet’s destinations are vast. However, its practice requires the customary because it uses the cumbersome equipment of the beginnings of the history of photography, the camera, the bellows … But the customary certainly does not prevent the cosmic. Jean-Michel Fauquet surveys its geometries and restores certain lively and ethical measures. Because his photographs are a way of fighting against stagnation. It offers the heaviness of possibilities of inspiration, therefore of a flight towards creativity. “Human work is to rebuild yourself forever,” he says. His works tell of its pangs and impulses.
Annabelle Gugnon
* Joachim Gasquet, “Cézanne”, published by Encre Marine, 2002.
Annabelle Gugnon is psychoanalyst and art critic. She was journalist for Beaux-Arts and regurlarly writes for Art Press.